Soundtrack: Just Mercy

Just Mercy
(c) Warner Bros.

Note: Below is a complete playlist of all 13 songs that can be heard in the movie “Just Mercy”. Some of these commercial songs are not included on the official soundtrack album, but are used in the movie.


All 13 songs featured in “Just Mercy”:

Song:Liste on:
Ode To Billie Joe - Martha Reeves & The Vandellas
Scene: Song can be heard at the beginning of the film. Johnny D is on the road with his car.
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Don't Wanna Fight - Alabama Shakes
Scene: Bryan goes to Alabama.
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Troubles of the World - Brother Samuel Cheatam
Scene: Bryan is stopped by the police.
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The Old Rugged Cross - Ella Fitzgerald
Scene: Herbert is to be executed in the electric chair.
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No More Auction Block for Me - Sweet Honey In the Rock
Scene: Johnny D looks at family photos.
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Higher Ground - J. Alphonse Nicholson
Scene:
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Dream Come True - Hilton Felton
Scene:
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Blessed Be The Name Of The Lord - Sister Emily Braum
Scene:
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Jesus Is With Me - The Mighty Indiana Travelers
Scene:
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Save Their Souls - Bohannon
Scene:
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Masterpiece - Atlantic Starr
Scene:
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I'm Gonna Lay Down My Life for My Lord - Bessie Jones & Group
Scene:
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The Old Rugged Cross - Karriem Riggins, Lynette Williams, Thomas Drayton and Justus West
Scene:
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The original score of “Just Mercy” includes 17 songs by the film composer “Joel P. West”.


Song:Length:
Just Mercy2:01
Holman Prison1:19
Johnny D.2:02
Jackson Cleaners2:16
Walter's Case1:16
Tell Me Everything1:05
Tapes1:44
We're Done Here0:50
Everybody Out1:04
Petition1:15
Courthouse1:28
Nowhere Near True2:05
Hearing1:40
Church0:55
60 Minutes3:20
Freedom4:17
Equal Justice2:10
The Old Rugged Cross4:31
Album Length: 35:18

What’s the movie about?
A powerful and thought-provoking true story. “Just Mercy” follows young lawyer Bryan Stevenson (Jordan) and his historic fight for justice. After graduating from Harvard, Bryan had a choice of several lucrative jobs. Instead, he sets out for Alabama to defend those wrongfully convicted, with the help of local attorney Eva Ansley (Larson). One of his first and most insurgent cases is that of Walter McMillian (Foxx), who was sentenced to death in 1987 for the infamous murder of an 18-year-old girl, even though the evidence of his innocence outweighs the evidence of his guilt and the only testimony against him came from a criminal with a motive to lie. In the years that followed, Bryan finds himself caught in a maze of legal and political maneuvering and overt and brazen racism as he fights for Walter and others like him, with odds – and the system – against them.

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